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Wanna get rid of your “Southern Accent”?

Christopher Harris

One of the things I have learned in my life is that, someone who has a “Southern Accent” is not automatically a moron, and someone who has a “Northeastern Accent” is not automatically a well cultured savant.

According to a recent article in the Knoxville News Sentinel, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has cancelled plans for a “Southern Accent Reduction” class because of objections from lab staff members, some of whom said they were offended by the training opportunity.

Here was the pitch to get employees to sign up for the speech rehab program: “Feel confident in a meeting when you need to speak with a more neutral American accent, and be remembered for what you say and not how you say it.”

The notice said the class would cover “some of the most common pronunciation and grammatical differences between Southern dialects and standard American English.”

It added: “In this course you will learn to recognize the pronunciation and grammar differences that make your speech sound Southern, and learn what to do so you can neutralize it through a technique called code-switching.”

Carolyn Ward of ORNL’s Learning and Development Services said the lab simply offered the class in response to an employee request. “We try to provide whatever requests we have,” she said.

ORNL spokesman David Keim said managers quickly cancelled the class after staff members complained.

“Given the way that it came across, they decided to cancel it,” Keim said. “It probably wasn’t presented in the right way and made it look like ORNL had some problem with having a Southern accent, which of course we don’t. That was not the intent at all.”

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has one of the region’s most diverse work populations, with employees from all parts of the United States and many different countries of origin, as well as visiting scientists from around the globe.

“We’ve offered accent reduction training to foreign nationals for years,” Keim said. “But this one obviously surprised some folks.”

Isn’t it sad that here in America, a “Southern Accent” is somehow comparable to the accent of a foreign national??  Say what you will about the South…but how many folks have you ever met, who decided to move to the Northeast when they retired?

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Comments

  1. michael

    my mother who was born in Southwest VA. Moved to Richmond as a teenager it seems force herself to lose the accent. she tried very hard to keep us from getting one. honestly I feel robbed

    • Leslie Brown

      Met a couple from Alabama the other day; you talk about an accent! Cute though. I lived in NJ when I was learning to talk, so it must sound pretty weird mixed in with “y’all” and “fixin'” to.

  2. jsq

    Never giving up my southern accent. Funny how the Yankees move south to get away from the problems of the north only to try to change the south to be like the north. Now they want to change the accent, apparently to make us all sound the same instead of accepting us for who we are. Tolerance and acceptance for all.

  3. Interesting article,I watched a show on the history channel and it stated that the American regional dialects are closer to the colonial English mother than many of the modern or nonsouthern dialects spoken throughout the USA today,the southern accents are a link to our nations historical past.

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