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“Nice” versus “Kind”

Leslie Brown

You may not think too much about it, but there is a difference between “nice” and “kind”.

“Nice” is to “happy”, as “kind” is to “joy”. “Nice” is about looking good from the outside, or to the outside world; perhaps even like the “whitewashed tombs” Jesus spoke of.  “Nice” is appearing, well “nice.”

“Kindness” is deeper, more caring; doing the kinds of things one may do when no one is watching.  What one does for someone who can maybe never pay them back.

26 year old Brooklyn police officer Marvin Luis was working near the African American Day Parade in Harlem.  You notice I didn’t hyphenate, because I don’t want to get fired, he he!

Attending the parade, 78 year old Bill Copeland, a retired social worker realized he had left his house without his wallet or cell phone, and his car was also dangerously low on gas.

Telling Officer Luis about his predicament, Luis quickly handed Copeland a twenty dollar bill saying, “Here, have a good day. Enjoy the parade.”

Copeland, not wanting the officer to think he was a panhandler recorded Officer Luis’ badge number and name, to pay back the money.  Copeland later wrote of the encounter, ““Please convey to Officer Luis my appreciation for his unusual act of kindness and compassion, which epitomizes the NYPD’s motto of Courtesy, Professionalism and Respect.”

Word spread through the department and two weeks ago Assistant Chief James Secreto applauded Luis’ good deed at a meeting between upper Manhattan precinct commanders and the heads of various community councils, citing it as an example of police doing good things.

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http://kindnessblog.com/2014/11/12/one-brooklyn-cop-one-pound-cake-and-a-20-loan/

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