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Trey Gowdy understands the role of Congress.

Christopher Harris

Back in 1776, one of the “Founding Fathers”, and a man who would become the 2nd President of the United States of America, John Adams, gave his Thoughts on Government. He said many powerful and thought-provoking things in those essays, but one of the most poignant statements was his opinion on “Natural Law”, and the role of a Congress in regards to “Natural Law”.

John Adams said:

“Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; and to give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary. But no part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the people of this commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws than those to which their constitutional representative body have given their consent.”

Everyone who doesn’t have their head in the sand is well aware of the fact that we are now living under tyranny. At this point in time, it may be a “soft tyranny”, but it is tyranny, nonetheless. Thank God that at this crucial point in time, we still have people like U.S. Representative, Trey Gowdy (R-SC-4th) who not only know and understand what it means to be an American, but he knows and understands what his moral, ethical, and legal obligation is, as a Representative of the people of the 4th Congressional District of South Carolina.

Check out the video of his speech from the House Floor, about the responsibility of Congress.

Here is a transcript of his speech:

“I want us to talk as colleagues, because our foundational document gave us as the House unique powers and responsibilities. We run every two years because they intended for us to be closest to the people. The President was given different duties and powers. The President was given the duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed, so my question, Mr. Speaker, is what does that mean to you?”

“We know the President can veto a bill for any reason or for no reason,” he continued. “We know the President can refuse to defend the constitutionality of a statute – even one that he signs into law. We know the President can issue pardons for violations of the very laws that we pass, and we know that the President has prosecutorial discretion as evidenced and used through his U.S. attorneys.

Mr. Speaker, that is a lot of power. What are we to do when that amount of power is not enough? What are we to do when this president, or any president, decides to selectively enforce a portion of a law and ignore other portions of that law? What do we do, Mr. Speaker, regardless of motivation, when a president nullifies our vote by failing to faithfully execute the law?”

“You know, in the oath that brand-new citizens take, it contains six different references to ‘the law.’ If it’s good enough for us to ask brand-new citizens to affirm their devotion to the law, is it too much to ask that the President do the same?

If a president can change some laws, can he change all laws? Can he change election laws? Can he change discrimination laws? Are there any laws, under your theory, that he actually has to enforce?

What is our recourse, Mr. Speaker? What is our remedy?”

“Maybe members of Congress would be respected more if we respected ourselves enough to require that when we pass something, it be treated as law.”

“Mr. Speaker, the House of Representatives does not exist to pass suggestions,” Gowdy concluded. “We do not exist to pass ideas. We make law. And while you are free to stand and clap when any president comes into this hallowed chamber and promises to do it with or without you, I will never stand and clap when any president – no matter whether he’s your party or mine – promises to make us a constitutional anomaly and an afterthought. We make law.”

Now if we could only clone him, 434 times, we would be a lot closer to finally having an Unhyphenated America.

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